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Alex Zangeneh Azam Zangeneh Azam من عند Kržava, صربيا من عند Kržava, صربيا

قارئ Alex Zangeneh Azam Zangeneh Azam من عند Kržava, صربيا

Alex Zangeneh Azam Zangeneh Azam من عند Kržava, صربيا

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I hope that Donohue writes more novels after this one because if they are as unique and well-written as The Stolen Child I will be first in line to read them. With The Stolen Child being his first novel Donohue definitely does not burst quietly on to the scene. The only problem he may encounter for any future novels is that he now has set the bar pretty high for himself now. A problem not uncommon in the writing world. What drew me to this book was the unique storyline and I was not disappointed. Plot, characters, writing, you name it, were all fully developed and interesting. You find yourself drawn to both Henry's and liking them both equally, which was another thing I liked about the book, it didn't force you to choose one over the other. At times the book did drag a bit, parts seemingly forced in to create a bridge between plot points or something. At least those bits weren't that long and I still wanted to continue reading. The most remarkable thing about the novel were the changelings themselves. Trapped in the unaging bodies of children, they often act like kids, mischeivous, playful, but they also spoke and acted like adults, conversing sometimes like a group of people you would expect to find in wheelchairs at a nearby rest home. The combination was perfect, never seemed forced and always believable. Had it not been that way, I think the novel would have been awful. But it wasn't, so yay! It was a good read. If you like folk lore and Lord of the Flies you'll more than likely like this book. Even if you don't like either I'd still suggest checking this book out, you may surprise yourself.